Category Archives: Tea sets

Collecting Doulton’s nursery rhyme series ware pattern ‘G’!

Nurseryware was and remains something of a speciality for Doulton with the enduring popularity of their Bunnykins range, which babies around the world receive in early childhood in the form of bowls and cups, together with a host of other items and of course the famous Bunnykins figures.

  
Back in the early 20th century many different nursery ware scenes were produced including this charming silhouette design. Introduced in 1907 and withdrawn by the mid-1930’s examples of this series are hard to find today, no doubt due to the fact that they were used for raising baby back in the day. Two D numbers can be found relating to this pattern D2833 & D4016.

This pattern features a central scene relating to a saying on the piece ; taken from famous rhymes such as Three Blind Mice and Rock-a-bye baby that are still taught to young children. In all there are only four designs which include the two titles above and Little Miss Muffet and There was a Little Man… 

Items typically found with this pattern include baby bowls, cereal bowls, mugs, jugs and small plates.

Collecting Doulton Brangwyn ware. 

Brangwyn ware 1930-40Both Nokes, Charles and then Cecil, were men ahead of their time, constantly on the search for something new and thus Doulton approached Frank Brangwyn R. A. to design a range of tableware and other designs for them. 

  
Fruit bowl and soap dish with Brangwyn designs.

Originally intended to offer to the masses quality china at a reasonable price, the designs proved unpopular at the time among the buying public and as always the rarity of this ware has meant that it has become very collectable since then. Interestingly critics of the time hailed Doulton’s new ware as the pinnacle of ceramic ‘mass’ production. 

  
Two colourings of dinner plates available l is D5033 and r is D5221.

In addition to tableware designs, Brangwyn’s designs can also be found on various vases which are equally popular today. This ware carries one of two backstamps, the first ‘Designed by Frank Brangwyn’ and also ‘Brangwynware’ a Doulton pastiche. 

  
Three classic Brangwynware vases. Tallest is 12″.

In addition, once again Doulton’s in-house designers produced similar designs to the official Brangwyn designs and these carry a D number.

Doulton’s teatime favourites! 

If drainpipes were the mainstay and indeed supporter of Doulton’s famous stoneware art wares at Lambeth, then it was their table and teawares that supported the many art ware productions of their Burslem factory, and without whose success we may not have the many collectible wares so cherished around the globe today.

  
A favourite art nouveau trio.

With such a rich history in tableware and teaware production there is a veritable wealth of patterns, shapes and periods to collect from early Spanishware, to Kingsware, seriesware, Bunnykins as well as period styles from the high Edwardian period to the popular deco styles of the 1920’s and 1930’s – once again Doulton more than provided for their clamouring public! 

  
A 1905 catalogue page showing popular blue and white designs.

A visit to any antiques market or fair today illustrates how this once unfashionable area is once again ‘de rigeur’ with trios in particular to be found on most ceramics stalls at such fairs. Indeed the increasing popularity of cookery shows on TV including the ever popular ‘Bake Off’ has helped drive up the popularity of tea parties once more.  

  
Illustration from a 1930’s tableware brochure titled ‘Grace before meat’.

This modern popularity has left the starchiness of high tea behind and what we have today is an eclectic mix of the old and new to suit the 21st C, which is once again making us dig out grannies favourite tea sets and adding new items to our tea tables! 

  
A selection of Doulton trios illustrating shape, period, target market place and varying Doulton lines including Bunnykins and Kingsware. 

Tea time with Royal Doulton! 

If drainpipes were the mainstay and indeed supporter of Doulton’s famous stoneware art wares at Lambeth, then it was their table and teawares that supported the many art ware productions of their Burslem factory, and without whose success we may not have the many collectible wares so cherished around the globe today.

  
A favourite art nouveau trio.

With such a rich history in tableware and teaware production there is a veritable wealth of patterns, shapes and periods to collect from early Spanishware, to Kingsware, seriesware, Bunnykins as well as period styles from the high Edwardian period to the popular deco styles of the 1920’s and 1930’s – once again Doulton more than provided for their clamouring public! 

  
A 1905 catalogue page showing popular blue and white designs.

A visit to any antiques market or fair today illustrates how this once unfashionable area is once again ‘de rigeur’ with trios in particular to be found on most ceramics stalls at such fairs. Indeed the increasing popularity of cookery shows on TV including the ever popular ‘Bake Off’ has helped drive up the popularity of tea parties once more.  

  
Illustration from a 1930’s tableware brochure titled ‘Grace before meat’.

This modern popularity has left the starchiness of high tea behind and what we have today is an eclectic mix of the old and new to suit the 21st C, which is once again making us dig out grannies favourite tea sets and adding new items to our tea tables! 

  
A selection of Doulton trios illustrating shape, period, target market place and varying Doulton lines including Bunnykins and Kingsware.