Category Archives: Uncategorized

Doulton, Beswick and Moorcroft Fair this Sunday -25th Nov 2018 @ World of Wedgwood! Free entry!

Looking for the perfect weekend activity? Then look no further! Come along this Sunday for the Winter fair at the World of Wedgwood where there will be pottery by our favourite pottery firms on offer from leading dealers.

In addition you can also purchase one of our fair specials subject to availability. There is this figure illustrated here which is available in a ltd Ed of just 15 pieces hand painted here in the uk by Master Painter, Chris Jackson.

Bunnykins Collectors will be pleased to hear that there will also be an exclusive fair Bunnykins on offer! More details to follow.

Doulton’s Checkmate with Tinworth

Few artists carry the gravitas of George Tinworth, but as Doulton’s first artist that mantle certainly is deserving.

On our Facebook page we’ve seen three examples of his work today and to complete a trio I thought I’d share this charming and possibly unique and complete chess set. Naturally individual pieces occasionally crop up, however, a complete set is something of a true marvel. We were fortunate to see this set in person at Whitley’s Auctioneers’ sale in California in June.

The unique set at Whitley Auctioneers’ June Sale

Tinworth is famous for his mouse studies and groups, apparently encouraged by no other than Sir Henry himself in their creation. This particular set dates to the last decade of the 20C.

An early photograph of a complete set c.1890.

Royal Doulton’s famous Bather figure.

The liberating period of the 1920’s to 1930’s often seems incongruous to non-Doulton figure collectors who associate ladies in ballgowns with Doulton figures, but those in the know, recall that there are a small group of nude figures produced in the art deco period that encapsulate that movement perfectly. All the figures contained in this small band of lady figures were the brain child of Leslie Harradine, Doulton’s then principal figure modeler.

As if to prove their own artistic credentials, Doulton introduced over a 10 year period several nude studies that confirmed their artistic prowess.

The first we must all know was Harradine’s The Bather, modeled on this contemporary advert for Cyclax bath salts.

There were six different versions of this popular model, with this colourway proving to be the most popular.

The Bather HN687.

In the succeeding years there was a second version of The Bather introduced, shown here. Although a different model, she was obviously intended to be a partner to the original.

The Bather HN773 (second version).

By the mid to late 1930’s tastes had changed and prudery was once more on the rise, and so a last version of this figure was introduced wearing a bathing suit, so reflecting the continued interest in lidos.

The Bather HN1708.

Royal Doulton’s advertising figure the ‘Standing Beefeater’.

This rather quaint figure produced in the early 1920’s is another advertising figure, but this time it’s purpose is to advertise the once popular Illustrated London News magazine. It covered all topical issues and as well as political comment, satire and stories, it also included full page prints for its readers of modern pictures. It was originally a weekly broadsheet but it move to bi-annual until it ceased production after the millennium.

The Beefeeter is a warder of the Tower of London and not a Yeoman of the Guard as is often stated. The Warder Beefeeter served the Towers prisioners and to protect the Crown Jewels but today they act more as tourist guides.

This Doulton personification of this famous London character holds an actual copy of the Illustrated London News from May 14 1842 , whose print is actually readable. Examples without any text do exist but it is the original that is most sought after.

The inspiration behind Royal Doulton’s popular figurine ‘Honey’ from 1939.

Produced in three colourways as HN 1909 and HN 1910 from 1939, and HN 1963 from 1941, Leslie Harradine’s Honey is one of a small number of figures introduced during WWII and which subsequently had a short production run.

Interestingly the pink version, HN 1909, is the most frequently found and the only one I have seen produced post war too, with a remodelled angle to her neck and different flowers too.

She is based upon this illustration by Stanislaus Longley, which incidentally was also used as a cover girl by high end retailer Liberty of London for this 1930s Christmas catalogue.

Honey HN 1910 and the Liberty Christmas catalogue mentioned.

As you can see Harradine altered the actual model from the illustration, as he frequently did, but it is one of a number of Longley designs which he derived inspiration for figures from.

Note the ‘HA 3’ on the base signifying that this is the third trial proposed and painted by Harry Allen.

If you would like to read more about the inspiration behind some of Royal Doulton’s most iconic figures, check out my book ‘Reflections’ online.