Doulton’s Titanian ware

There were two great Doulton art factories in the 1920’s, with others factories both in the UK and in Europe too where more utilitarian goods such as Doulton drainpipes and sanitaryware were produced.

In Burslem, where figure production had been revived, Doulton’s Art Director, C. J. Noke was simultaneously keen to establish and indeed re-discover many of the ancient Chinese transmutation glazes of yesteryear. He had already re-discovered, introduced to the public in 1904 at the St. Louis Exhibition and by the 1920’s firmly established the world famous Doulton Flambé glazes but Noke together with his team of assistants continued experimenting with glazes and bodies so that today we have other glaze wares including Chang, Chinese Jade and of course Titanian to collect.

20140511-155407.jpg

The diversity of Titanianwares from handpainted, to glaze, to seriesware.

The unique Titanian glaze uses a titanium oxide which results in a bluey colour and pieces of Titanian ware can vary from white to dark blue glazes.

20140511-155538.jpg

An unusual Titanian vase illustrating the varied colour of this glaze.

It was often used as the background to Doulton’s fine porcelain wares that were painted with typically birds but also oriental figures and flowers by leading artists including Harry Allen, F. Henri and Harry Tittensor.

20140511-155413.jpg

A charming Titanian vase and owl, handpainted.

20140511-155426.jpg

A group of desireable, floral Titanian vases.

20140511-155545.jpg

A typical Titanian vase signed F. Allen.

20140511-155434.jpg

A tall Titanian vase with a Bird of Paradise design.

Doulton’s seriesware was also in some instances given a Titanian glaze including the Sunset with Poplars range and of course the Tutankhamen set commemorating the opening of the Egyptian King’s tomb in the early 1920’s.

20140511-155557.jpg

A Titanian lidded sugar commemorationg the opening of Tutankhamen’s tomb.

Figures too were given the Titanian treatment and three of the rarest figures today are commonly found in Titanian when they occasionally do turn up, namely the Australian and New Zealand Digger figures and their British counterpart Blighty – all issued at the end of the first world war.

20140511-155606.jpg

The rare Blighty in a Titanian glaze.

The body of Titanian pieces can vary immensely from an egg-shell like porcelain to a heavy earthenware. This diversity in body is reflected in the price range for these wares, but this in turn allows varied scope for collectors today.

20140511-155419.jpg

Here is a heavily gilden earthenware Titanian rose bowl.

My own particular tastes when it comes to Titanian are for the unusual shapes and glaze effects rather than the handpainted items. The Titanian glaze was introduced in 1915 and in production until ca.1930  and so pieces of Titanian ware can be found if you have a keen eye or if you have a dealer onside who will search these pieces out.

20140511-155401.jpg

A catalogue page from 1924 illustrating the types of pieces that appeal to me.

20140511-155441.jpg

A group of interesting shaped Titanian vases.

20140511-155453.jpg

Above and below a lustred Titanian dish with butterfly.

20140511-155500.jpg

As always, if you have pieces in your collections please share via our Doulton Collectors Club facebook page!

 

 

 

 

 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s