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Royal Doulton seascapes

Inspired by lots in Whitley’s Auctioneers’ sale in just over a week, which will take place as part of a Royal Doulton Convention and Auction weekend January 12-14 (2018) in Orlando, I thought it the perfect opportunity to look more closely at some examples of Royal Doulton’s sea themed work.

Just as with paintings and photography, the sea and sea-life have long provided inspiration for ceramic painters and those at Royal Doulton have produced some magnificent examples covering a wide spectrum of their ranges produced, particularly those wares we today class as Burslem products.

A magnificent Flambé vase with gilded fish against a Sung background.

The wonderful Mermaid figure displayed according to the contemporary advert from 1917.

1920s lustre vase with seascape.

A unique Titanian bowl.

An early Burslem seascape which would probably have had plated fittings to form a biscuit barrel or the like.

For further information on Whitley’s Auctioneers upcoming sale to include many star Royal Doulton works of art, visit:

https://www.liveauctioneers.com/auctioneer/6087/whitley-s-auctioneers/

 

Doulton’s Burns Night specials! 

With Burns Night about to be celebrated around the world, I decided it was time to look at Doulton’s commemoratives to Scotland’s national hero.


Robert Burns scenes 2 & 3, with Scotch Girl HN 1269.

A Burns supper is a celebration of the life and poetry of the Scottish poet Robert Burns. Burns suppers are usually held on or near the poet’s birthday, 25 January and the occasion is more commonly known as Burns Night.
 Burns seriesware plate Pattern C.

A piper generally greets the guests and everyone stands as the main course is brought in – haggis.  
Pattern A scene 1.

Doulton’s love of all things Scotch is apparent from the number of Scottish scenes featured on their famous hand painted wares by leading artists; the Figures in their HN collection in national dress and of course the many Scottish themed series in their series ware collection.


Handpainted vase with Dryburgh Abbey in the Borders by Plant. 
 Miniature Burns seriesware pattern B jug.

Burns can himself be found immortalised in the HN collection and also tributes to him are plentiful in the series ware range with three different patterns.


Robert Burns HN 3641.

Doulton’s nesting owls and owlets! 

Animals have always been a popular giftware line for Doulton’s with many animal models even pre-dating the first introductions to their famous HN figure range in 1913.


A Titanian vase featuring an owl – always a popular subject!

One particular animal that always has collectors clamouring for it is the owl – produced in many variations from character examples, to realistic interpretations!


A very unusual version of Granny Owl.

Even before the early HN animals, owls featured in many Doulton Lambeth works of art! The great Leslie Harradine modelled this vase for reproduction; ‘night and day’ shown here with the owl central to the night panel!


There are further examples by the likes of Simmeon and Pope of garden statuary…


…and of course this charming Bibelot…


…to this tooth pick holder…


….and even this wonderful biscuit or tobacco jar in the form of an owl!

Returning to the Burselm studio, owls featured frequently in Doulton’s hand painted wares and in particular their Titanian range such as this example…


…and there is also a charming seriesware pattern featuring owls to collect – although examples are hard to find!


Doulton’s owl studies from the Burselm studio can be found in unusual glazes from Flambé to Sung, although once again these are hard to come by today!


Rare flambé Owl and Owlet.

Perhaps my favourite example is this character owl ‘Granny Owl’ HN 187, wrapped up in her shawl and who perhaps explains their popularity as it embodies that romantic feel Doulton owls have and why collectors fight to own these delightful studies!

When is a figure a finished product?

Figure adaptations by Christopher Evans

As all figure collectors know, during the design process prototypes followed by pilot figures are produced and these models can change in their modelling quite simplistically or quite dramatically at this early stage.

Here is a prototype I once saw and then a few months later saw a version with her holding a mask rather than the mirror you see below.

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However, once a figure has gone into production that does not mean that further adaptation and transformation is not possible nor can this be ruled out!

At no other time and to no other group of figures does this more aptly apply than to those of the 1920’s and 1930’s. With production dates for this period being so sketchy one can only attempt to draw conclusions as to the precise dates of withdrawal and sometimes even introduction.

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Sweet Maid (above) became Millicent (below)

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This is of particular relevance to a group of figures which are clear adaptations of existing figures. Take for example Harradine’s Sweet Maid HN1504 (1932 LH) which became Millicent HN1714 (1935 LH) or his Helen HN1509 (1932 LH) which became June HN1690 (1935 LH).

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The Windmills Lady (above) who became Old Lavender Seller (below)

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The scarcity of the former in both cases suggests that the latter may have replaced these earlier models. Then again, we have The Windmill Lady HN1400 (1930 LH) and The Old Lavender Seller HN 1492 (1932 LH). Clearly the old lady is the same in both figures with minor adaptation. Both figures were produced simultaneously, as were the Rustic Swain HN 1745 (1935 LH) and Midsummer Noon HN1899 (1939 LH). It was not just Harrading who adapted their own earlier models.

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The Rustic Swain (above) which became the solitary Midsummer Noon (below)

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However this tendancy to adapt existing figures can be traced back to even the earliest times of Doulton figure production in the early 20th Century and then the introduction of the HN figure range. Consider Noke’s reintroduction of the many Jesters he had produced earlier in Vellum and then Tittensor’s Pretty Lady HN69 (1916 HT) and The Parson’s Daughter HN 337 (1919 HT) which both have clear similarities in the modelling of their skirts.

Existing models were not only adapted but also changed size and renamed, such as Biddy HN1445 (1931 LH) and Rita HN1448 (1931 LH), or Doris Keane HN90 (1918 CJN) and Rosamund HN1497 (1932 LH).

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Here we have a hard paste porcelain version of Doris Keane by John Broad made at Doulton’s Lambeth factory in the early 20th Century, together with her miniature self M32 made at their Burslem factory in the 1930’s

It is worth noting a little something about the production dates given to figures and that in my experience the date of ‘by 1949’ is rarely the case, indeed ‘by 1944’ would be much more accurate, with the exception of a handful of the most popular figures of the time such as Paisley Shawl HN1392, Autumn Breezes HN1934, Top o’ the Hill HN1849, The Orange Lady HN 1759 and Biddy Penny Farthing HN1843, whose production continued into 1944 and was resumed soon after the end of WWII principally , if not solely for the export market; more precisely for the USA and Canada.